Transmission of Nerve Impulses

Transmission of Nerve Impulses - Transmission of Nerve...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Transmission of Nerve Impulses The transmission of a nerve impulse  along a neuron from one end to the  other occurs as a result of electrical  changes across the membrane of the  neuron. The membrane of an  unstimulated neuron is polarized—that  is, there is a difference in electrical  charge between the outside and inside  of the membrane. The inside is  negative with respect to the outside. Polarization is established by  maintaining an excess of sodium ions  (Na + ) on the outside and an excess of 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
potassium ions (K + ) on the inside. A  certain amount of Na +  and K +  is always  leaking across the membrane through  leakage channels, but Na + /K +  pumps in  the membrane actively restore the ions  to the appropriate side. The main contribution to the resting  membrane potential (a polarized nerve)  is the difference in permeability of the  resting membrane to potassium ions  versus sodium ions. The resting  membrane is much more permeable to  potassium ions than to sodium ions  resulting in slightly more net potassium  ion diffusion (from the inside of the 
Background image of page 2
neuron to the outside) than sodium ion  diffusion (from the outside of the  neuron to the inside) causing the slight  difference in polarity right along the  membrane of the axon. Other ions, such as large, negatively 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 11

Transmission of Nerve Impulses - Transmission of Nerve...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online