CFR Structural Issues of the American Economy

CFR Structural Issues of the American Economy - W O R K I N...

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Unformatted text preview: W O R K I N G P A P E R The Evolving Structure of the American Economy and the Employment Challenge Michael Spence and Sandile Hlatshwayo March 2011 The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher dedicated to being a resource for its members, government officials, busi- ness executives, journalists, educators and students, civic and religious leaders, and other interested citizens in order to help them better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other countries. Founded in 1921, CFR carries out its mission by maintaining a diverse membership, with special programs to promote interest and develop expertise in the next generation of foreign policy leaders; convening meetings at its headquarters in New York and in Washington, DC, and other cities where senior government officials, members of Congress, global leaders, and prominent thinkers come together with CFR members to discuss and debate major in- ternational issues; supporting a Studies Program that fosters independent research, enabling CFR scholars to produce articles, reports, and books and hold roundtables that analyze foreign policy is- sues and make concrete policy recommendations; publishing Foreign Affairs , the preeminent journal on international affairs and U.S. foreign policy; sponsoring Independent Task Forces that produce reports with both findings and policy prescriptions on the most important foreign policy topics; and providing up-to-date information and analysis about world events and American foreign policy on its website, CFR.org. The Council on Foreign Relations takes no institutional positions on policy issues and has no affilia- tion with the U.S. government. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion contained in its pub- lications are the sole responsibility of the author or authors. For further information about CFR or this paper, please write to the Council on Foreign Relations, 58 East 68th Street, New York, NY 10065, or call Communications at 212.434.9888. Visit CFR’s website, www.cfr.org. Copyright © 2011 by the Council on Foreign Relations®, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. This paper may not be reproduced in whole or in part, in any form beyond the reproduction permit- ted by Sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law Act (17 U.S.C. Sections 107 and 108) and excerpts by reviewers for the public press, without express written permission from the Council on Foreign Relations. For information, write to the Publications Office, Council on Foreign Relations, 58 East 68th Street, New York, NY 10065. 1 Abstract This paper examines the evolving structure of the American economy, specifically, the trends in em- ployment, value added, and value added per employee from 1990 to 2008. These trends are closely connected with complementary trends in the size and structure of the global economy, particularly in the major emerging economies. Employing historical time series data from the Bureau of Labor Sta-the major emerging economies....
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course VARIOUS Various taught by Professor Various during the Fall '11 term at S.F. State.

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CFR Structural Issues of the American Economy - W O R K I N...

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