Magnini - The Cascading Affective Consequences of Exercise...

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The Cascading Affective Consequences of Exercise among Hotel Workers Vincent Magnini, Virginia Tech Gyumin Lee, Virginia Tech BeomCheol (Peter) Kim, Virginia Tech 1
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Introduction The strong correlation between employee satisfaction and customer satisfaction has been empirically demonstrated numerous times in extant literature (e.g. Goodman and Yanovsky, 1997; Wieseke et al., 2007). 2
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Introduction In the hotel sector, turnover rates for line-level employees have been estimated at around 60% (Woods et al., 1998). 3
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Introduction Due to the known negative consequences of low employee satisfaction and turnover, the hospitality literature is replete with studies that attempt to identify antecedents of these outcomes (e.g. Chathoth et al., 2007; Karatepe and Magaji, 2008). 4
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Introduction Since research indicates that an individual’s level of exercise is highly correlated with his/her stress level (Breus and O’Connor, 1998; Kennedy and Newton, 1997; Petruzzello et al., 1997) and mood (Gauvin and Rejeski, 1993; Lutz et al., 2003), it seems plausible that employee exercise may ultimately be associated with job satisfaction and organizational commitment. 5
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Purpose 6 Exercise Hours Emotional Intelligen ce Cognition -based Trust Affect- based Trust Job Satisfacti on Org. Commitmen t H 1 (+ ) H 4 (+) H 3 (+ ) H 2 (+ ) H 6 (+ ) H 5 (+ ) H 7 (+ )
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Hypothesis Development Exercise Emotional Intelligence (EI) As previously stated, research indicates that an individual’s level of exercise is highly correlated with his/her stress level (Breus and O’Connor, 1998) and mood (Lutz et al., 2003). In the business literature, Neck and Cooper (2000) report a correlation between fitness and increased mental performance and a reduction of anxiety; further, Goldsby et al. (2001) discuss an association between exercise and higher levels of energy and enhanced feelings of well- being. 7
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Hypothesis Development Exercise Emotional Intelligence (EI) A person’s level of EI is also robustly associated with his/her level of stress and general mood (optimism, happiness) (Vakola et al., 2004). Distinct from general intelligence, EI can be defined as “the ability to monitor one’ own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions” (Salovey and Mayer, 1990, pp. 189). 8
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Hypothesis Development Exercise Emotional Intelligence (EI) The health belief model (HBM) serves as theoretical anchoring for an exercise EI linkage (Saklofske et al. 2007). In accord with the HBM model, an individual reaps a perceived benefit from exercise which can be used to develop the self-regard, self-actualization, and stress tolerance components of EI. Thus, within a hotel context, based upon this stream of logic the following hypothesis is offered: H1: A hotel associate’s frequency of exercise is positively 9
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Hypothesis Development EI Cognition-based Trust Trust is
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course STATS 221 taught by Professor Nielson during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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Magnini - The Cascading Affective Consequences of Exercise...

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