1 intro - Introduction to Microbiology Dr. James Smith...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Microbiology Dr. James Smith Introduction and History of Microbiology What is a microbe? Single celled organisms Range in size from mm to nm; can only see individual cells through a microscope Not all are bad Not all can survive alone Biofilms Viruses Microbial and entity sizes Log10 Microbiology Figure 1.1 Circular single stranded Circular single stranded Satellite Stanley Prisiner Mad Cow Kuru Disease Major advancements had to be made in order to study microorganisms Development of microscopes powerful enough to observe microbes (more later) Development of molecular biology Sequencing of genomes Many genomes have already been sequenced The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) has either sequenced or supported sequencing of microbes Fred Sanger Walter Gilbert & Paul Burg Human Microbiome Project Microbial Classification Can classify by biochemical properties Sequencing allowed for better classification Woeses three domains of life Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence Archaea are not bacteria (similar size, different biochemically) Eubacteria Physical Features Vary Significantly Cynaobacteria ( blue green algae) filamentous Actinomycetes (terrestrial bacteria) form hyphae and stalks ANTIBIOTICS Caulobacter spp. Exist as a sticky sessile bacterial or mobile free swimming flagellated bacteria Myxococcus functions very much like slime mold by producing fruiting bodies Cynaobacteria Actinomycetes Caulobacter Myxococcus Multicellular Differentiation Archaea Resemble Eubacteria, but are biochemically distinct Extremophiles Osmolarity Dead Sea, High Temperature hot springs, High Pressure volcanic vents Eukaryotes Physical defining feature is that they have a nucleus *some exceptions for instance Giardia Compose the plants, animals, and fungi Single celled forms are yeast, protozoans, some forms of algae...
View Full Document

Page1 / 55

1 intro - Introduction to Microbiology Dr. James Smith...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online