Bar Charts, Histograms[1]

Bar Charts, Histograms[1] - Bar Charts, Frequency...

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Bar Charts, Frequency Distributions, and Histograms Frequency Distributions, Bar Graphs, and Circle Graphs The frequency of a particular event is the number of times that the event occurs. The relative frequency is the proportion of observed responses in the category. Example: We asked the students what country their car is from (or no car) and make a tally of the answers. Then we computed the frequency and relative frequency of each category. The relative frequency is computed by dividing the frequency by the total number of respondents. The following table summarizes. Country Frequency Relative Frequency US 6 0.3 Japan 7 0.35 Europe 2 0.1 Korea 1 0.05 None 4 0.2 Total 20 1 Below is a bar graph for the car data. The height represents the frequency. Notice that the widths of the bars are always the same. We make a circle graph often called a pie chart of this data by placing wedges in the circle of proportionate size to the frequencies.
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Below is a pie chart the shows this data. Histograms
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course STA 2122 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at FIU.

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Bar Charts, Histograms[1] - Bar Charts, Frequency...

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