learningtosee3 - The problem with seeing is that it is so...

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The problem with seeing is that it is so easy and natural that we never give it a second thought. We look. We see. What could be simpler? But behind that simple act lies a profound process that affects how we act, think, learn, and how we photograph. We learned seeing early in life. And the seeing we learned was one that would help us survive. One that would help us avoid speeding cars and guide us down stairs. Not one that would help us photograph. At first we paid attention to everything we saw because everything was new and interesting. Cupboard knobs, pebbles, leaves were all given their due. But eventually they became old hat and boring. So we learned to ignore. After the first few years of life, we ignored more that we saw, and our seeing became casual and uneventful . Sometime later in life we put a camera to eye and began photographing. We photographed what appealed to our habits of casual seeing. We photographed things we thought were supposed to be photographed because we had seen similar photographs in magazines and books. And our results were not works of art but snapshots… When dissatisfied with our results, we often seek solutions in new lenses and filters or in special techniques like panning. We avoid the real solution - ourselves. Admit it or not, you have preconceptions.
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learningtosee3 - The problem with seeing is that it is so...

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