Ancient lecture 6

Ancient lecture 6 - Obscene Greek for off-stage or in front...

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“Obscene” Greek for “off-stage” or “in front of filth” Skené (scenic wall) => “first backstage” (465BCE) Paraskenia (stone side wings: doors) (425BCE) Creon on displaying blind Oedipus to the polis: “This is obscene” (p.182, l.1568) Certain events cannot be enacted onstage and must be “performed” offstage and then narrated by a witness or messenger Suicide of Jocasta Blinding of Oedipus Telling/narration vs. showing/enactment Is anything deemed “obscene” in Pseudolus ?
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“Hubris” Excessive pride or self-confidence Fall of Oedipus vs. Rise of Pseudolus Each man exhibits hubris —but very different outcomes Title characters in tragedy vs. comedy Tragedy=terrible fall of a great man Comedy=triumph of the underdog Ancient comedy’s triumph of the underdog --> contemporary TV “situation comedies” like The Office ?
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Comedy in Ancient Rome Plautus’s Pseudolus (191BCE) Fabula = based on Greek subjects and influenced by Greek New Comedy (323-260 BCE)
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Ancient lecture 6 - Obscene Greek for off-stage or in front...

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