F11Physics1CLec12B

F11Physics1CLec12B - Physics 1C Lecture 12B "Imagine...

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Physics 1C Lecture 12B "Imagine if we taught baseball the way we teach science. Undergraduates might be allowed to reproduce famous historic baseball plays. But only in graduate school would they, at last, actually get to play a game." --Alison Gopnik
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Announcements Makeups – during problem discussion section Also contact Forrest – fsheldon@physics.ucsd.edu Notify Forrest and me ASAP Look over all of the quiz and exam dates NOW
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SHM: Mathematical Model Equations of motion for SHM: Remember, simple harmonic motion is not uniformly accelerated motion
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SHM: Mathematical Model The maximum values of velocity and acceleration for an object in SHM: The velocity is 90 o out of phase with the displacement and the acceleration is 180 o out of phase with the displacement
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SHM – Example 1 Initial conditions at t = 0 are: x (0)= A and v (0) = 0 This means f = 0 The acceleration reaches extremes of  w 2 A The velocity reaches extremes of  w A
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SHM – Example 2 Initial conditions at t = 0 are: x (0)= 0 and v (0) = V i This means f = - p /2 The graph is shifted one- quarter cycle to the right compared to the graph of x (0) = A Energy of the system
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Mass-Spring Energy Let’s assume a spring-mass system is moving on a frictionless surface This is an isolated system, therefore the total energy of the system is constant The kinetic energy is: KE = 1/2 mv 2 = 1/2 m w 2 A 2 sin 2 ( t + f ) The elastic potential energy is: PE = 1/2 kx 2 = 1/2 kA 2 cos 2 ( t + ) The total energy is: KE + PE = 1/2 kA 2 (action figure)
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course PHYS 1C taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '07 term at UCSD.

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F11Physics1CLec12B - Physics 1C Lecture 12B "Imagine...

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