Ch11Lessons

Ch11Lessons - Inferences for Distributions Inference for...

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Unformatted text preview: Inferences for Distributions Inference for the Mean of a Population Confidence intervals and tests of significance for the mean are based on the sample mean x . The sampling distribution of x has as its mean. That is, x is an unbiased estimator of the unknown . The spread of x depends on the sample size and also on the population standard deviation . In the previous chapter we made the unrealistic assumption that the we knew the value of . In practice, is unknown. We must estimate from the data even though we are primarily interested in . The need to estimate changes some details of tests and confidence intervals for , but not their interpretation. Conditions for inference about a mean Our data are a simple random sample (SRS) of size n from the population of interest. Observations from the population have normal distribution with mean and standard deviation . In practice, it is enough that the distribution be symmetric and single- peaked unless the sample is very small. Special Note Both and are unknown parameters. We estimate with the sample standard deviation s . The sample mean x has the normal distribution with mean and standard deviation n . We estimate n with n s . This quantity is called the standard error of the sample mean x . When the standard deviation of a statistic is estimated from the data, the result is called the standard error of the statistic. 1 The t distribution When we know the value of , we base confidence intervals and tests for on the one-sample z statistic n x z - = This z statistic has the standard distribution N(0,1) When we do not know , we substitute the standard error n s of x for its standard deviation n . This statistic that results does not have a normal distribution . It has a distribution that is new to us, called a t distribution . The spread of the t distribution is a bit greater than that of the standard normal distribution. The t distribution has more probability in the tails and less in the center than does the standard normal. This is true because substituting the estimate s for the fixed parameter introduces more variation into the statistic. As the degrees of freedom k increase, the t(k) density curve approaches the N(0,1) curve ever more closely. This happens because s estimates more accurately as the sample size increases. So using s in place of causes little extra variation when the sample is large. The one-sample t procedures Confidence Interval Procedure 2 Assuming the conditions are met, a level C Confidence Interval for is n s t x * Where * t is the upper 2 ) 1 ( C- critical value for the t(n-1) distribution....
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Ch11Lessons - Inferences for Distributions Inference for...

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