Chapter 12 I - Chapter 12 Emotional Behaviors What is...

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Chapter 12 Emotional Behaviors
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What is Emotion? Psychologists define emotion in terms of three components: 1. Cognition 2. Readiness for action 3. Feeling
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What is Emotion? • Emotional situations arouse the autonomic nervous system. • Each situation evokes its own special mixture of sympathetic and parasympathetic arousal
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What is Emotion? The James-Lange theory of emotion suggests that the autonomic arousal and skeletal action occurs first in an emotion. The emotion that is felt is the label that we give the arousal of the organs and muscle
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What is Emotion? • James-Lange theory leads to two predictions: 1.People with a weak autonomic or skeletal response should feel less emotion. 2.Increasing one’s response should enhance an emotion
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Is Physiological Arousal Necessary for Emotion? Research indicates the following: • Paralyzed people report feeling emotion to the same degree as prior to their injury • People with “pure autonomic failure” still report feeling emotion but less intensely. – Pure autonomic failure - output from the autonomic nervous system to the body fails. • Suggests other factors are involved in the perception of emotion.
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• According to the James-Lange theory, emotional feelings result from the body’s action. • Panic attacks are marked by extreme sympathetic nervous system arousal. – Only if perceived as occurring spontaneously. Is Physiological Arousal Sufficient for Emotions?
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Is Physiological Arousal Sufficient for Emotions? • Creating certain body actions may also slightly influence emotion. – smiling slightly increases happiness. – Inducing a frown leads to the rating of stimuli as slightly less pleasant. • Indicates that perception of the body's actions do contribute to emotional feeling • However, body’s actions are not required. – Example: Möbius syndrome
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• Creating certain body actions may also slightly influence emotion. – smiling slightly increases happiness. – Inducing a frown leads to the rating of stimuli as slightly less pleasant. • Indicates that perception of the body's actions do contribute to emotional feeling
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are not required. – Example: Möbius
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This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course BIOL 3300 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at UT Arlington.

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Chapter 12 I - Chapter 12 Emotional Behaviors What is...

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