ch10 - ch10 Student:

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: ch10 Student: ___________________________________________________________________________ 1. Make this inductive (statistical) syllogism into a relatively strong argument by supplying an appropriate premise or conclusion: Greg must be into all that New Age stuff since he wears his hair in a ponytail. 2. Make this inductive (statistical) syllogism into a relatively strong argument by supplying an appropriate premise or conclusion: People who go to Burning Man are not like you and me. Why just look at how odd Greg is! 3. Make this inductive (statistical) syllogism into a relatively strong argument by supplying an appropriate premise or conclusion: Dennis plays trumpet in the marching band at Yale, so he probably doesn't have a girlfriend. 4. Make this inductive (statistical) syllogism into a relatively strong argument by supplying an appropriate premise or conclusion: We're going to the home of our Italian friends, Marco and Claudia, for dinner. I suspect it'll be really good. 5. Make this inductive (statistical) syllogism into a relatively strong argument by supplying an appropriate premise or conclusion: A vast number of people who care about sustainability have a vegetable garden, so Scott probably does, too. 6. Make this inductive (statistical) syllogism into a relatively strong argument by supplying an appropriate premise or conclusion: Most people with old cars have financial problems, so Anne and Dennis must be struggling financially. 7. Identify the type of fallacy in the following passage -or you could put this in terms of whether the inductive generalization has a "confidence level" in the conclusion that is too high or an "error margin" that is too narrow for the facts asserted in the premise(s). Housing is far too expensive in this country. Why, the median price of a home in most of California is now over $350,000. 8. Identify the type of fallacy in the following passage -or you could put this in terms of whether the inductive generalization has a "confidence level" in the conclusion that is too high or an "error margin" that is too narrow for the facts asserted in the premise(s). Overheard: "You don't think this country is in a slump? Get real. George here was laid off before Memorial Day, and Howie's wife and a whole bunch of other people lost their jobs when the Safeway over on Jeffrey closed down. These are tough times." 9. Identify the type of fallacy in the following passage -or you could put this in terms of whether the inductive generalization has a "confidence level" in the conclusion that is too high or an "error margin" that is too narrow for the facts asserted in the premise(s). We're gonna have trouble with that new paper boy, Honey. He's been late twice already. 10. Identify the type of fallacy in the following passage -or you could put this in terms of whether the inductive generalization has a "confidence level" in the conclusion that is too high or an "error margin" that is too narrow for the facts asserted in the premise(s).that is too narrow for the facts asserted in the premise(s)....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course PHIL 233 taught by Professor Linker during the Fall '11 term at University of Michigan-Dearborn.

Page1 / 61

ch10 - ch10 Student:

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online