Lecture11 - Cardiac and Smooth Muscle

Lecture11 - Cardiac and Smooth Muscle - Cardiac and Smooth...

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Cardiac and Smooth Muscle Cardiac Muscle Cardiac muscle is similar to skeletal muscle in: - Composed of Actin, Myosin, Tropomyosin and Troponin - Sliding Filament Theory of Contractoin But is unique in ECC in that it has a Calcium induced calcium release pump in addition to the Sodium activated pump. Physically… - It is striated, with multiple mitochondria and a rich capillary supply. - Has a less developed Sarcoplasmic Reticulum - Intercalated disks - Junctions between cells allow ions to pass from one cell to the next without having to pass through the plasma membrane of the cells. - Action potentials don’t spike as with only a fast sodium channel, instead plateauing with the slower calcium activated. - Calcium is stored/released from both the SR as well as the T tubules as the SR is not as well developed and does not have enough calcium to create a strong enough contraction. Smooth Muscle Differs in: - Lacks striated pattern - Develops tension extremely slowly but can maintain it for long periods of time at a low cost - Has membrane receptors and transduction mechanisms for many neurotransmitters and hormones Two types; 1. Single Unit Often surround hollow organs Contains gap junctions which allow action potentials to pass from cell to cell Produce steady waves of contraction 2. Multi-unit Individual fibers, not connected by gap junctions
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course BMVS 4064 taught by Professor Dr.lee during the Spring '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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Lecture11 - Cardiac and Smooth Muscle - Cardiac and Smooth...

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