PSY350 Altruism Experiment

PSY350 Altruism Experiment - Altruism Study (Group 1:...

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Altruism Study (Group 1: Joshua Dray, Steven Leon, Emily Cowie, Shawn Reed) Joshua Dray April 22, 2011 PSY350 Abstract: This experiment based on altruism focused on how strangers would respond when there was an individual in need of help in a public environment. There is no material reward being offered to any individuals simply a ‘thank you’ will be said unto those individuals that help. In our experiment we have to different test groups, one being a male test group, and the other being a female test group. Each test group is to carry a large abundance of objects accidently drop them, and test whether strangers would stop and help the individuals out. Our test was to see whether there was a larger group of strangers that helped out the female verses the male group. The altruism of their reactions to another human in need displays and qualifies the idea that good is naturally instilled in people and is brought out when concerning others of the same species.
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Introduction: The purpose of this altruism project is to determine the altruistic actions of strangers when reacting to another person in trouble in spite of the fact that the person in need is also a stranger. There is no reward offered to those reacting to the person who has dropped a large load of papers and no reward is given at all after their subsequent reactions other than a heartfelt ‘thank you’ from the helped individual. Our group believed that altruism exists in everyone even though actions and behaviors aimed at achieving altruism are tainted with personal self-interests and motivating factors. For this experiment, the lack of an incentive makes the equation of altruism easier to comprehend since there is no specific reason for anyone to assist a fallen individual, other than a psychological gratification that may be gained by helping the individual. The group member would discretely enter a public area densely populated between class periods carrying an armful of boxes, school materials, papers and other miscellaneous objects. The person would then drop the objects and slowly proceed to pick them up. The number of individuals that helped the members in an altruistic fashion were strangers and if anyone that helped knew the group member than they were disqualified from the research because their relationship with the person disqualifies them from being a neutral party in this experiment. The
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calculation of altruism was enhanced with the removal of an incentive but another factor was added in the procedure. Said factor was the implementation of genders in regards to altruism and whether strangers would be more likely to help a person of the opposite sex than their own. Our hypothesis was that strangers would unknowingly embrace altruism by helping the people in need of assistance in a public place even though they were in sight of everyone inhabiting the
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This note was uploaded on 12/10/2011 for the course GSIS 100 taught by Professor Jones during the Spring '11 term at Embry-Riddle FL/AZ.

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PSY350 Altruism Experiment - Altruism Study (Group 1:...

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