CSC_349_HANDOUT#2 - COMPUTER SCIENCE 349A Handout Number 2...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 COMPUTER SCIENCE 349A Handout Number 2 Measures of error (pages 54-57 of the 5 th edition of the textbook; pages 56-59 of the 6 th edition) If p denotes the true (exact) value of some quantity, and * p denotes some approximation to p , then * p p E t = is called the absolute error , and p p p p p t * 1 * = = ε (if 0 p ) is called the relative error . Absolute error is not a meaningful measure of error unless you know the magnitude of p , the quantity you are approximating. For example, if 1234000 * and 1234321 = = p p , then 321 = t E seems large, although * p is quite accurate and agrees with p to 4 significant digits; if 001111 . 0 * and 001234 . 0 = = p p , then 000123 . 0 = t E seems small, although * p is not very accurate and agrees with p to only 1 significant digit. Relative error , which is always meaningful, in fact indicates the number of correct significant digits in an approximation * p . Example
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/10/2011 for the course CSC 349 taught by Professor Oadje during the Spring '11 term at University of Victoria.

Page1 / 3

CSC_349_HANDOUT#2 - COMPUTER SCIENCE 349A Handout Number 2...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online