Molecular Models - Molecular Models Discovering Molecules...

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Molecular Models: Discovering Molecules in 3D Anna Krajec November 21, 2011 Lab Section 01
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Conclusion It is difficult to imagine protein and nucleotide folding on paper. Lecture has taught us how important primary and secondary structures are to a molecule, but the necessary folding— and the way that affects its function—has remained relatively ambiguous. This lab helped to better understand what the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins and nucleotides entail. First we looked at DNA and RNA structures. We had previously learned the differences between A, B, and Z DNA and RNA, but being able to see them prominently showed the distinctions. A DNA is “thicker” than B DNA, with a greater diameter. Both are right-handed helices, however, which Z DNA is not. The diameter of Z DNA is smaller than even B DNA. As the diameter in the DNA decreases, the major and minor grooves become less prominent. The Phenylalanyl-transfer RNA that we viewed looked rather similar to the B DNA. The grooves
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Molecular Models - Molecular Models Discovering Molecules...

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