The Biochemistry of Buffer Systems

The Biochemistry of Buffer Systems - The Biochemistry of...

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The Biochemistry of Buffer Systems: Buffer Testing and Histidine Titration Anna Krajec September 11, 2011 Lab Section 01
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Conclusions In the first part of the experiment we created our own buffer systems. Some were pairs of acids and their conjugate bases; others were amphoteric substances; one was deionized water. It is one thing to be told in an equation that the protons of an acid added to a buffer will be taken up by the proton acceptor in a buffer or that water will be created when a base is added; it is another thing to see that happen. I learned that the buffering pairs we used resisted change in pH better than the amphoteric ones we used. This makes sense since a buffering pair is more tailored to the substances it would encounter in a natural environment. The amphoteric substances, while indeed changing more than the pairs, still had considerable buffering power compared to the control, water. This made it clear how useful buffers would be in a natural cellular environment. I had also not made the connection that a buffer’s own pH would, in fact, correlate with its
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This note was uploaded on 12/10/2011 for the course BCH 5045 taught by Professor Guy during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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The Biochemistry of Buffer Systems - The Biochemistry of...

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