East Asian Civilization What do Gardens signify Unit 2 Exam Questions

East Asian Civilization What do Gardens signify Unit 2 Exam Questions

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Unit 2 Exam East Asian Culture 1. Both Sui and Tang empires occupied the same location. In 582, Emperor Wen of Sui Dynasty sited a new region southeast of the much ruined Han Dynasty Chang'an to build his new capital, which he called Daxing (Great Prosperity). Daxing was renamed Chang'an in year 618 when the Duke of Tang, Li Yuan, proclaimed himself the Emperor Gaozu of Tang empire. Chang'an in the Tang Dynasty (618—907) was, along with Constantinople ( Istanbul ) and Baghdad , one of the largest cities in the world. It was a cosmopolitan urban center with considerable foreign populations from other parts of Asia and beyond. This new Chang'an was laid out on a north-south axis in a grid pattern, dividing the enclosure into 108 wards and featuring two large marketplaces , in the east and west respectively. Chang'an's layout influenced city planning of several other Asian capitals for many years to come. Chang'an's walled and gated wards were much larger than conventional city blocks seen in modern cities, as the smallest ward had a surface area of 68 acres and the largest ward had a surface area of 233 acres (0.94 km 2 ). [7] The height of the walls enclosing each ward were on average 9 to 10 ft (3.0 m) in height. [7] The Japanese built their ancient capitals, Heijokyo (today's Nara ) and later Heian-kyo or Kyoto , modelled after Chang'an in a more modest scale yet was never fortified. [8] The modern Kyoto still retains some characteristics of Sui-Tang Chang'an. Similarly, the Korean Silla dynasty modeled their capital of Gyeongju after the Chinese capital. Sanggyeong , one of the five capitals of the state of Balhae , was also laid out like Chang'an. Finally, in 906 AD and 907 AD, a mutinous General led his armies to an impoverished and powerless City of Chang 'An, to put a final end to the Tang Dynasty. By the helping hand of his own Chancellor Zhu Quanzhong the last Tang emperor, Emperor Ai, was forced to abdicate. The Title of the Dynasty was changed to Liang, officially ending the long and prosperous Tang Dynasty Era. With the Fall of Tang Dynasty, the Han Chinese Empire disintegrated into separate fiercely competing fiefdoms, leading to half a century of warring Kingdoms. The Kingdoms were ruled by Feudal Clan Families who survived the Empires' Demise and often helped in its ending in order to start out as Sovereigns for themselves. This was the so called Five Dynasty Period 2. lncense
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course ASIAN STUD 241 taught by Professor Tschanz during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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East Asian Civilization What do Gardens signify Unit 2 Exam Questions

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