ECE 110 Auto-tune Paper - In 1996, a former oil company...

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In 1996, a former oil company employee named Andy Hildebrand changed the course of pop music. Years earlier, Hildebrand literally struck oil by using a mathematical signal processing method called autocorrelation (or sometimes as covariance) to map area under the earth’s surface. While this field of work (known as “seismic data exploration”) was financially rewarding, at the age of 40 Hildebrand decided to turn his efforts towards voice enhancement. After only a few months of tweaking, Hildebrand was able to implement autocorrelation in a way that would detect and alter pitch. He called his product “Auto-Tune”. Auto-Tune spread like wildfire among music producers who used the product to correct wrong notes in the vocal tracks of singers. The general public was generally unaware of the growing phenomenon until Cher’s song “Believe” hit the airwaves in 1998. Auto-Tune has a “re-tune speed” from 0 to 400 that can be set by the user. Most producers prior to “Believe” used Auto-Tune in the midrange of the speed
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course ECE 101 taught by Professor Rahggeb during the Spring '11 term at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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ECE 110 Auto-tune Paper - In 1996, a former oil company...

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