Still - Still,, , .Intheory,though,Tiberius'accession

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Still, succession proved problematic, in that while Augustus could maintain in his person an ad  hoc collection of supreme powers based on his  Auctoritas,  no one who followed him would  possess his social power and esteem—he was peerless. In theory, though, Tiberius' accession  could have been flawless. He was an able general and administrator, with years of experience of  seeing Augustus make the Principate work. He was also not without reputation. From the start  though, problems emerged. Perhaps he was less than gracious in his relations with the Senate,  etc. due to his advanced age. Augustus lived so long that Tiberius waited in the wings for  decades, at one time passed over as favored heir. Most importantly, though, there was simply no  way to live up to Augustus' image. He developed a terrible reputation in Senate histories, mostly  related to his use of murder. In comparison to later rulers though, he was undistinguished in this  regard. Something that his Principate did begin to demonstrate, however, was the degree that the  Senate and administration as a whole was in thrall to the Emperor. Still considering their state a  republic, senators grew to resent the domination of the polity exercised by Tiberius in a way less 
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Still - Still,, , .Intheory,though,Tiberius'accession

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