The only major disturbance during Hadrian

The only major disturbance during Hadrian -...

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The only major disturbance during Hadrian's reign was again related to the Jews. When the  emperor visited Judaea in 130, he found Jerusalem in desolated ruins. His idea was to rebuild it,  making it a new Jerusalem—Aelia Capitolina—without Jews. As well, a new temple to Jupiter  was to be built on the site of the old Jewish Temple in Jerusalem, destroyed in 70 CE. These  plans elicited an organized revolt under the Jewish leader Bar Kokhba, which was supported by  several in the rabbinical class who viewed the uprising in messianic terms. A Roman legion was  soon destroyed, and a guerrilla war ensued. The British general Severus was brought in, and  Hadrian went to Antioch with six supporting legions. By 135, the revolt was over, with Aelia  Capitolina being built and no Jews allowed in Judaea, though the prohibition was impossible to  enforce fully. Hadrian then died in 138. He had executed his two successor candidates, fearing  conspiracies. Hadrian was hated by the Roman elite at his demise, given the lack of conquests  during his reign, the increasingly intrusive civil service, and suggestions of Italy's diminution  within the Empire. His successor Antoninus Pius almost refused Senatorial investment when the 
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The only major disturbance during Hadrian -...

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