Tiberius was left with no male heir in the years directly before his death

Tiberius was left with no male heir in the years directly before his death

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Tiberius was left with no male heir in the years directly before his death. He therefore took  Germanicus' son Gaius into his palace and cultivated the youth. Upon Tiberius' death in 37, the  Praetorian Prefect Macro, an acquaintance and ally of Gaius, proclaimed the latter as Princeps,  and the Senate ratified the choice. Gaius was better known as Caligula, meaning 'little boots'. He  had been taken by his father Germanicus on his several German campaigns, and had been  equipped with miniature roman centurion's uniform, complete with little boots. Hence the  nickname, which stuck. His rule begins the Julio-Claudian dynasty, all of whose members were  descended by blood from Augustus (related himself to Julius Caesar), or to the latter's third wife  Livia (previously married to T. Claudius Nero). Caligula began his rule well: he stopped the rash  of treason trials, recalled political exiles, gave shows for the Roman populace, and brought his  uncle Claudia, despised son of Antonia, into the political arena. In October of 37, though, 
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Tiberius was left with no male heir in the years directly before his death

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