A first question regards the disturbances at the beginning of his rule

A first question regards the disturbances at the beginning of his rule

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A first question regards the disturbances at the beginning of his rule. Were the Nika Riots  extremely serious? On the one hand, he could very well have lost his rule in an urban revolt and  coup. On the other hand, it was put down as soon as the Emperor displayed resoluteness, and he  was not faced with similar outbursts during the rest of his reign. It seems that this incident  captures the volatility and degree of urban politicization in Constantinople and other cities of  those years, setting it off from Western Europe which did not possess the degree of political  sophistication, urban development, or popular involvement. It also demonstrates the intermittent  confluence of interests between claimants and disaffected urban factions, and the peril of  excessive Imperial fiscal extractiveness. It should not be construed as revealing systemic  weakness in the emerging Byzantine body politic, but rather the political vitality of its subjects.
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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