Having regained imperial preeminence

Having regained imperial preeminence -...

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Having regained imperial preeminence, the indefatigable Justinian surged forward, first with the  reconquest of Vandals in North Africa. Relations between the Vandal rulers and the populace  were poor. While the occupiers followed Arianism, the African Church was strongly Catholic,  and had a solid ecclesiastical basis. Vandals had tried since the 450s to weaken the Catholic  Church, but had not succeeded, merely alienating the population and remaining obnoxious in the  eyes of Eastern Rome. Additionally, in the 520s, Childeric had become Vandal king. Anxious to  improve relations with Constantinople, he cut back on harassment of Catholics. In 530 he was  overthrown by his heir Gelimer, thus giving Justinian a legal pretext for invasion. Imperial  victory was quick. Part of this was due to increased factionalization of Vandal leadership. Also,  the Vandals as a whole had not transformed from a garrisoned occupying power to a fully  naturalized population, and indigenous Catholics supported Roman return. Thus, though Vandal  forces attacked oncoming Imperial vessels near Carthage, brilliant tactics by Belisarius drove  them back. Upon Roman disembarkation, the mere appearance of Huns mercenaries under the  general's command caused the Vandals to flee en masse, and after a subsequent battle, the 
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Having regained imperial preeminence -...

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