Problems of imperial continuity also point to the major

Problems of imperial continuity also point to the major -...

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Unformatted text preview: Problems of imperial continuity also point to the major 'Achilles heel' of Roman politics: imperial succession. Beyond hereditary rule, which was disconcerting to the Roman civic tradition, the Romans had never worked out a good system. Even in particularly problematic times though, such as the Year of the Four Emperors (68-69 CE), overall coherence of the imperial system, and persistence of local, senatorial, provincial administration had worked through the difficulties. Now, with foreign military pressures and their economic ramifications, political destabilization mattered much more. From 235-85, more than 20 plausible emperors were acclaimed by their armies. For the first time in generations, Pax-Romana cracked on the Rhine, in Gaul, and along the Danube. Along with these changes in leadership dynamics were also economic changes, particularly in the...
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