The dispute which erupted in the early 450s was similar to the Arianism controversy of the 300s in t

The dispute which erupted in the early 450s was similar to the Arianism controversy of the 300s in t

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The dispute which erupted in the early 450s was similar to the Arianism controversy of the 300s  in that involved the nature of Christ and his relationship to the other parts of the Trinity. Back in  448 the cleric Eutyches had been accused of spreading the doctrine that Christ was  not  bot  human and divine. Rather, being more powerful than human, Christ's divinity had overpowered  his mortality. Thus, Christ possessed only a single nature. This made sense given Hellenistic  philosophical assumptions of the East. This was called Monophysitism, and after its proponents  appealed to friendly bishops as well as the Pope Leo I, it became an expanding crisis in the  Christian world. In 451, the Fourth Ecumenical Council was held at Chalcedon. Including nearly  600 bishops, the council condemned Eutyches again (he had been previously reinstated) and  articulated the Chalcedonian Definition: Christ was held to possess one person and two natures,  "unconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly and inseparably" united. Though satisfactory in the 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

The dispute which erupted in the early 450s was similar to the Arianism controversy of the 300s in t

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online