Part of this third phase that ultimately strengthened continental efforts was the conversion of Angl

Part of this third phase that ultimately strengthened continental efforts was the conversion of Angl

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Unformatted text preview: Part of this third phase that ultimately strengthened continental efforts was the conversion of Anglo-Saxon England. Politically, England was divided into seven statelets established after the Anglo-Saxon invasions. These included Kent, Wessex, Northumbria, and Mercia as the most important. Irish monks had already made some limited inroads by the 570s, and after King Aethelbehrt of Kent had married Frankish King Charibert's daughter, the former had been required to allow a Frankish bishop and retinue into his kingdom. It was the Pope Gregory, however, who gave the greatest push to English conversion. He sent a monk named Augustine (d. 605) to Kent in 597, whom Aethelbehrt allowed to preach from a monastery in Canterbury. The King and his people soon converted to Roman Catholicism, and Augustine became Archbishop of Canterbury. East Saxons then converted around 604, with a bishop posted to London. Though of Canterbury....
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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