The first century of Church history is filled with intellectual dilemmas and doctrinal disputes

The first century of Church history is filled with intellectual dilemmas and doctrinal disputes

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The first century of Church history is filled with intellectual dilemmas and doctrinal disputes.  The first to emerge has been called Arianism, after the Alexandrian priest Arius who enunciate  the doctrine that Christ was "neither co-eternal with nor equal" to God in divinity. In short,  Christ was on a lower level. Though condemned by the local bishop, a controversy ensued,  necessitating the 325 Council of Nicaea, presided over by Emperor Constantine himself. Arius'  ideas were condemned and he was exiled, though he was later restored to his position by  Constantine, who himself moved closer to the Arian position by the end of his life. Arianism was  more attractive to Easterners, for whom it was more philosophically straightforward. For the next  fifty years, Eastern Emperors and their church vacillated regarding doctrine, and only in the 381  First Council of Constantinople was Arianism definitively and finally condemned. It never 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online