These controversies were related to questions of preeminence in the Church itself

These controversies were related to questions of preeminence in the Church itself

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These controversies were related to questions of preeminence in the Church itself. By the death  of Constantine, there were four primary geographical foci to the Church's hierarchy: Rome,  Alexandria (Egypt), Antioch (Syria), and Constantinople. They were all theoretically equal,  having been founded by Peter or his legates. It was not long before their archbishops began to  assert primacy vis-à-vis each other. From the beginning of the fifth century, Rome began to surge  forward. Its chief rival was Constantinople. As the capital of the remnant of the Roman Empire  that was officially Christian, the latter city and its Patriarch could already claim significance.  Further, in line with precedent set by Constantine, Eastern Emperors had seen their church as an  extension of their royal prerogatives, supervising appointments and meddling in doctrine. Part of  this entailed insisting upon Constantinople's importance in the Church hierarchy. This was 
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These controversies were related to questions of preeminence in the Church itself

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