Yet another major change in the lives of Europeans prior to the Enlightenment was the weakening of a

Yet another major change in the lives of Europeans prior to the Enlightenment was the weakening of a

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Yet another major change in the lives of Europeans prior to the Enlightenment was the  weakening of adherence to traditional religious authority. The questioning of religion  itself can largely be traced to the tensions created by the  Protestant Reformation which split the Catholic Church and opened new territory for theological debate.  Additional seeds were planted by  Baruch Spinoza  (1632–1677), a Jewish lens grinder  and philosopher from Amsterdam who developed a philosophy emphasizing ethical  thought as the guide to conduct. Spinoza called into question the tenets of both Judaism  and Christianity: he believed in God but denied that the Bible was divinely inspired and  rejected the concept of miracles and the religious supernatural. He claimed that ethics  determined by rational thought were more important as a guide to conduct than was  religion.
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Yet another major change in the lives of Europeans prior to the Enlightenment was the weakening of a

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