A few wealthy women of the time were able to break the mold of subjugation to achieve at the least f

A few wealthy women of the time were able to break the mold of subjugation to achieve at the least f

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A few wealthy women of the time were able to break the mold of subjugation to achieve  at the least fame, if not independence. Lucrezia Borgia, the daughter of Pope Alexander  VI, was one such woman. As pope, Alexander VI attempted to use Lucrezia as a pawn  in his game of political power. To further his political ambitions he arranged her marriage  to Giovanni Sforza of Milan when she was thirteen, in 1493. Four years later, when he  no longer needed Milan's political support to as great a degree, he annulled the  marriage after spreading false charges of Sforza's impotence. Alexander VI then  married Lucrezia to the illegitimate son of the King of Naples. The Borgia legend  stipulates that Cesare Borgia, Lucrezia's older brother, murdered Lucrezia's son  produced by this marriage. In 1502, at the age of 22, Lucrezia was again divorced and  remarried, this time to the duke of Ferrara, Alfonso d'Este. She remained in Ferrara until 
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A few wealthy women of the time were able to break the mold of subjugation to achieve at the least f

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