In reaction to the rather empirical philosophies of Voltaire and others

In reaction to the rather empirical philosophies of Voltaire and others

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In reaction to the rather empirical philosophies of Voltaire and others,  Jean-Jacques  Rousseau  wrote  The Social Contract  (1762), a work championing a form of government  based on small, direct democracy that directly reflects the will of the population. Later, at  the end of his career, he would write  Confessions,  a deeply personal reflection on his  life. The unprecedented intimate perspective that Rousseau provided contributed to a  burgeoning  Romantic  era that would be defined by an emphasis on emotion and  instinct instead of reason. Skepticism Another undercurrent that threatened the prevailing principles of the Enlightenment was  skepticism . Skeptics questioned whether human society could really be perfected  through the use of reason and denied the ability of rational thought to reveal universal  truths. Their philosophies revolved around the idea that the perceived world is relative to 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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In reaction to the rather empirical philosophies of Voltaire and others

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