Niccolo Machiavelli rose to even greater literary prominence

Niccolo Machiavelli - Niccolo Machiavelli rose to even greater literary prominence and a prominence with a legacy more durable than Pico's A

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Unformatted text preview: Niccolo Machiavelli rose to even greater literary prominence, and a prominence with a legacy more durable than Pico's. A Florentine statesment, Machiavelli rose to prominence during the Florentine Republic under Savonarola in 1498. After the Medici regained power in 1512, Machiavelli retired from government (involuntarily), moved to his estate outside Florence, and began to write. Convinced from his experiences in government that Italy could survive only if unified under a strong leader, in 1513, Machiavelli published The Prince , the best known piece of writing of the renaissance period. Perhaps also intended as a means to curry favor with the Medici leader of the moment, The Prince was intended as a guidebook for the eventual leader of all of Italy and as a reference for rulers everywhere. In its pages, Machiavelli argued that it was better for a leader to be feared than loved, and advocated that a "prince" should do...
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Niccolo Machiavelli - Niccolo Machiavelli rose to even greater literary prominence and a prominence with a legacy more durable than Pico's A

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