Rome received its final push to renaissance glory from Pope Leo X

Rome received its final push to renaissance glory from Pope Leo X

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Rome received its final push to renaissance glory from Pope Leo X, second son of  Lorenzo de Medici. He came to the papal throne in 1513, following Julius II. He was at  ease in social situations, a skilled diplomat, demonstrated great skill as an administrator,  and was an intelligent and beneficent patron of the arts. He encouraged scholarly  learning, and supported the theatre, an art form considered to be of ambiguous morality  until that time. Most prominently, he supported the visual arts of painting and sculpture.  He is well known for his patronage of Raphael, whose paintings played a large role in  the redecoration of the Vatican. Under Leo X, the ruins of Rome began to be more  effectively preserved, and metaphorically, so did the morality of the Papacy. When he  died in 1521, Rome's Golden Age effectively ended, and the Renaissance as a whole  began to fade.  Rodrigo Borgia, later Alexander VI, has assumed the role of the archetypical 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Rome received its final push to renaissance glory from Pope Leo X

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