The Middle Ages had not been kind to the city of Rome

The Middle Ages had not been kind to the city of Rome -...

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The Middle Ages had not been kind to the city of Rome. As the darkness of medieval  times had obscured the glory and intellectualism of the Roman Empire, it had also  descended physically on the former center of the empire. Citizens of Rome felt little  attachment to their historical roots, and thus saw no reason to expend a great deal of  energy preserving the city. The glorious buildings of Rome thus began their long  decline, at the mercy of looters and thieves. Without the protection of the citizens, the  buildings began to crumble and many became less and less visible as dirt and waste  built up around them. The fourteenth century schism in the Catholic Church, which  caused the Papacy to move its headquarters to Avignon, was the final crushing blow for  Rome, which suffered from the removal of wealth and power and became a city of  poverty and sadness. The Romans of the fourteenth century had forgotten the glory of 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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The Middle Ages had not been kind to the city of Rome -...

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