The millennium of the Middle Ages had been marked by unwavering religious devotion and unfathomable

The millennium of the Middle Ages had been marked by unwavering religious devotion and unfathomable

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The millennium of the Middle Ages had been marked by unwavering religious devotion  and unfathomable cruelty. Rarely before or after did the Church have as much power as  it did during those thousand years. With the Holy Roman Empire as a foundation,  missions such as the Crusades and Inquisition were conducted in part to find and  persecute heretics, often with torture and death. Although standard at the time, such  harsh injustices would eventually offend and scare Europeans into change. Science,  though encouraged in the late Middle Ages as a form of piety and appreciation of God’s  creation, was frequently regarded as heresy, and those who tried to explain miracles  and other matters of faith faced harsh punishment. Society was highly hierarchical, with  serfdom a widespread practice. There were no mandates regarding personal liberties or  rights, and many Europeans feared religion—either at the hands of an unmerciful God 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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