The reestablished monarchy had clear limits placed on its absolute power

The reestablished monarchy had clear limits placed on its absolute power

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Unformatted text preview: The reestablished monarchy had clear limits placed on its absolute power, however, as was made clear in the bloodless Glorious Revolution of 1688, in which the English people overthrew a king they deemed unacceptable and basically chose their next rulers. The revolution occurred because Charles IIs son, James II , was an overt Catholic, which did not sit well with the predominantly Protestant public. The English people rallied behind James IIs Protestant daughter, Mary , and her husband, William of Orange , who led a nonviolent coup that dethroned James II and sent him to France. When William and Mary ascended the throne, they effectively ended the Catholic monarchy and the idea of divine right. In the years that followed, an English Bill of Rights was drafted, boosting parliamentary power and personal liberties. In this freer environment, science, the arts, and philosophy flourished.environment, science, the arts, and philosophy flourished....
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The reestablished monarchy had clear limits placed on its absolute power

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