The settlement of Bologna in 1530 placed most of Italy in Spanish hands

The settlement of Bologna in 1530 placed most of Italy in Spanish hands

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The settlement of Bologna in 1530 placed most of Italy in Spanish hands. Venice,  Florence, and the Papal States retained their independence, but were compelled to  cooperate with the Spanish to their great inconvenience in order to survive. Under high  taxes and tight restrictions, the Italian economy crumbled and intellectual and artistic  production declined. The power of the Church declined under the pressure of the  Protestant Reformation, which had begun in 1517. That power suffered still further when  Henry VIII broke with Rome in 1532 over his desire for a divorce from Catherine of  Aragon. The Church reacted drastically in Italy, censoring writing and art and reaffirming  the doctrines of Catholicism more rigidly than they had during the Renaissance period.  Gradually, the spirit of the Renaissance was sapped and replaced with a more somber  outlook. Though much of the change wrought by the Italian Renaissance proved 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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