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The women of the Renaissance

The women of the Renaissance - The women of the Renaissance...

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Unformatted text preview: The women of the Renaissance, like women of the Middle Ages, were denied all political rights and considered legally subject to their husbands. Women of all classes were expected to perform, first and foremost, the duties of housewife. Peasant women worked in the field alongside their husbands and ran the home. The wives of middle class shop owners and merchants often helped run their husbands' businesses as well. Even women of the highest class, though attended by servants, most often engaged in the tasks of the household, sewing, cooking, and entertaining, among others. Women who did not marry were not permitted to live independently. Instead, they lived in the households of their male relatives or, more often, joined a convent. A few wealthy women of the time were able to break the mold of subjugation to achieve at the least fame, if not independence. Lucrezia Borgia, the daughter of Pope Alexander at the least fame, if not independence....
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  • Fall '08
  • Murphy
  • Lucrezia Borgia, married Lucrezia, housewife. Peasant women, class shop owners, loving relationship. Isabella

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The women of the Renaissance - The women of the Renaissance...

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