Considered the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment

Considered the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment...

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Considered the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment, Immanuel Kant (1724– 1804) was enormously influential and essentially founded an entire school of thought out  of the blue. Living and working in relative isolation in Königsberg, East Prussia, for his  entire life, Kant began his career as a tutor and then took a position as professor in a  local university. He spent that time, however, studying the works of other philosophers  and formulating his own postulates about the world, which he finally released as the  Critique of Pure Reason  (1781). The  Critique  is a response to the questions that Descartes, Hume, Leibniz, and other  contemporaries had posed about perception and reality. Attacking the age-old question  of knowledge versus experience,  Critique  proposes that all people are born with an  inborn sense of raw experience—a phenomenon that Kant dubbed transcendental 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Considered the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment...

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