Orphaned in Geneva at an early age

Orphaned in Geneva at an early age -...

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Orphaned in Geneva at an early age, the nomadic and self-taught  Jean-Jacques  Rousseau  (1712–1778) drifted about for most of his youth, contributing intellectually  however he could. He devised a new system for musical composition (since rejected),  submitted articles to Diderot’s  Encyclopédie , and composed essays on various topics. It  was one of these essays,  Discourse on the Arts and Sciences  in 1750, which first  earned him renown. He followed it up with  Discourse on the Origin of Inequality  (1755), which solidified his reputation as a bold philosopher. This work charted man’s  progression from a peaceful, noble state in nature to an imbalanced state in society,  blaming the advent of various professions and private property for the inequality and  moral degradation. Rousseau moved around quite a bit during the next few years but  still found time to write two more pivotal works. The novel 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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Orphaned in Geneva at an early age -...

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