The Critique is a response to the questions that Descartes

The Critique is a response to the questions that Descartes...

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The  Critique  is a response to the questions that Descartes, Hume, Leibniz, and other  contemporaries had posed about perception and reality. Attacking the age-old question  of knowledge versus experience,  Critique  proposes that all people are born with an  inborn sense of raw experience—a phenomenon that Kant dubbed transcendental  idealism. Whereas the Enlightenment had been built around the idea that man can  discover  the laws of nature with his mind, Kant countered that it is the mind that  gives  those laws to nature. In so doing, he elevated skepticism to unfathomable heights,  cemented his place high atop the pantheon of philosophy, and knocked the  Enlightenment down a few rungs. Kant’s work with skepticism perfectly sums up the German Enlightenment’s mistrust of  empiricism. The  Critique  suggests that we all are born with our own ideas and 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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The Critique is a response to the questions that Descartes...

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