The Industrial Revolution in the Western world in the late 1800s had its roots in Enlightenment

The Industrial Revolution in the Western world in the late 1800s had its roots in Enlightenment

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The Industrial Revolution in the Western world in the late 1800s had its roots in  Enlightenment-era Europe. Beginning in the mid-1700s, industrialization truly exploded  in 1769 when Scottish inventor James Watt (1736–1819) substantially improved the  steam engine, which enabled the development of a primitive factory system. Afterward,  Europe saw the number of industry-related patents increase tenfold before 1800. The  industrial boom had a number of positive effects: it attracted capitalist investors, who in  turn precipitated more growth; it created jobs that provided more stability for families;  and, as a result, it prompted population growth. Industrialization was not without its downsides, however. When factories first opened,  there was no industrial regulation in place. Factory smokestacks polluted the European  landscape so severely that some regions have yet to recover. Poor, willing workers 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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The Industrial Revolution in the Western world in the late 1800s had its roots in Enlightenment

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