The Constitution outlines a federal government with three separate branches

The Constitution outlines a federal government with three separate branches

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The Constitution outlines a federal government with three separate branches: the  legislative branch (Congress), the executive branch (the presidency), and the judicial  branch (the courts). Over time, however, other key elements of government have  developed and become just as important, such as the federal bureaucracy, political  parties, interest groups, the media, and electoral campaigns. We will cover these  components in detail in upcoming chapters. The Legislative Branch  Congress is the legislative branch of the federal government and is responsible for  creating laws. Congress consists of two chambers, an upper chamber called the Senate  and a lower chamber called the House of Representatives. Congress has the sole  authority to make laws, levy taxes, declare war, and print money, among other powers.  Congress also controls the federal budget. The Executive Branch 
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course POSI 1310 taught by Professor Arnold during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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