Case Study 1

Case Study 1 - Case Study #1 ECON 2100 Population Paradox...

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Case Study #1 ECON 2100 “Population Paradox” All rights are reserved of the resources used within this document and are to be used for education purposes only. Redistribution of any document within the case study is prohibited. Please refer to each article for source information. Table of Contents “Population and the Environment: The Global Challenge.” D. Hinrichsen and B. Robey………………………………………………………. .2-5 “Another Inconvenient Truth: The World's Growing Population Poses a Malthusian Dilemma” D. Biello…………………………………………………………………………….6-8 Questions………………………………………………………………………………………9
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2 “Population and the Environment: The Global Challenge” By Don Hinrichsen and Bryant Robey http://www.actionbioscience.org/environment/hinrichsen_robey.html October 2000 The challenge: provide for increasing populations without destroying the environment. As the century begins, natural resources are under increasing pressure, threatening public health and development. Water shortages, soil exhaustion, loss of forests, air and water pollution, and degradation of coastlines afflict many areas. As the world’s population grows, improving living standards without destroying the environment is a global challenge. Most developed economies currently consume resources much faster than they can regenerate. Most developing countries with rapid population growth face the urgent need to improve living standards. As we humans exploit nature to meet present needs, are we destroying resources needed for the future? Environment getting worse About 3 million die from pollution each year. In the past decade in every environmental sector, conditions have either failed to improve, or they are worsening: Public health: Unclean water, along with poor sanitation, kills over 12 million people each year, most in developing countries. Air pollution kills nearly 3 million more. Heavy metals and other contaminants also cause widespread health problems. Amount of land lost to farming by degradation equals 2/3 of North America. Food supply: Will there be enough food to go around? In 64 of 105 developing countries studied by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the population has been growing faster than food supplies. Population pressures have degraded some 2 billion hectares of arable land — an area the size of Canada and the U.S. Freshwater: The supply of freshwater is finite, but demand is soaring as population grows and use per capita rises. By 2025, when world population is projected to be 8 billion, 48 countries containing 3 billion people will face shortages.
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3 Coastlines and oceans: Half of all coastal ecosystems are pressured by high population densities and urban development. A tide of pollution is rising in the world’s seas. Ocean fisheries are being overexploited, and fish catches are down.
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course ECON 2100 taught by Professor Moore during the Spring '07 term at UGA.

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Case Study 1 - Case Study #1 ECON 2100 Population Paradox...

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