Ess 3318 - Injury (1)

Ess 3318 - Injury (1) - Psychosocial Aspects of Sport...

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Psychosocial Aspects of Sport Injury
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Psychology of Sport Injury Outline Antecedents (Causes): How Injuries Happen Reactions: Cognitive & Emotional Responses Rehabilitation & Recovery Performance Return to Competition
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Objectives Demonstrate knowledge of the psychological antecedents (i.e. causes) of injury Compare two models used to explain injury responses & highlight personal & situational factors moderating injury responses Demonstrate knowledge of the role of psychosocial factors in injury rehabilitation Demonstrate awareness of 3 key return-to-sport challenges
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Causes of Sport Injury Injuries don‟t just happen… they are caused Environmental, Biomechanical, or anatomical factors Psychological factors Often these causal factors interact.
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Causes of sport injury Physical factors are the primary causes of athletic injuries, but psychological factors also contribute. Psychological Antecedents Personality factors Mixed findings about personality factors associated with injuries – E.g., Paradox of Sensation Seeking (Smith, Smoll, Ptacek, 1990)
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Causes: How Injuries Happen Although personality has yielded mixed findings, Stress is consistently related to injury onset (Andersen and Williams, 1988 - revised by Williams & Andersen, 1998)
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Injury Causes: Stress–Athletic Injury Model Coping resources Psychological Skill Interventions Potentially Stressful Situation Stress Response Attentional Narrowing Attentional Distraction Muscle tension History of stressors Perception of Threat (cognitive appraisal) Williams & Andersen (1998) Personality factors
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Causes: What about the moderators? Personality Personality factors are not directly related to the incidence of athletic injuries, but they are directly and indirectly related to how the athlete reacts to the stress response (Williams & Andersen, 1998).
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Causes: What about the moderators? History of Stressors It is not just the stress generated from the immediate environment that predisposes injury. People with high levels of life stress have more sport -and exercise - related injuries (e.g., Williams & Andersen, 1998).
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History of stressors Life stress and daily hassles undermine the ability to effectively address the stress response and associated physiological and attentional changes. Provides a partial explanation for the common case of recurring injury…or „injury plagued‟ athletes. Causes: What about the moderators?
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Coping resources Examples: Social support – when social support is present, the relationship between life stress and athletic injury is negligible (Patterson et al., 1998). Attentional strategy – Associative vs. dissociative
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Ess 3318 - Injury (1) - Psychosocial Aspects of Sport...

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