notes6b

notes6b - Uniform Circular Motion (Section 6.5) An object...

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Unformatted text preview: Uniform Circular Motion (Section 6.5) An object moving on a circular path of radius r at a constant speed v As motion is not on a straight line, the direction of the velocity vector is not constant The motion is circular v v v r Compare to: 1D – straight line 2D – parabola Velocity vector is always tangent to the circle Velocity direction constantly changing, but magnitude remains constant Vectors r and v are always perpendicular Since the velocity direction always changes, this means that the velocity is not constant (though speed is constant), therefore the object is accelerating v r a The acceleration a r points radially inward. Like velocity, its direction changes, therefore the acceleration is not constant (though its magnitude is) Vectors a r and v are also perpendicular The speed does not change, since a r acceleration has no component along the velocity direction Why is the acceleration direction radially inward? Why is the acceleration direction radially inward?...
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This note was uploaded on 12/10/2011 for the course PHY 1111 taught by Professor Stencil during the Fall '11 term at UGA.

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notes6b - Uniform Circular Motion (Section 6.5) An object...

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