notes12a - the satellite equals the period of Venus, T s =T...

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Orbital Motion of Satellites (12.3) m M Satellites move in circular (or more generally, elliptical) orbits Compute their period and speed by applying Newton’s 2 nd Law in the radial direction Orbital period Orbital speed
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Example Venus rotates slowly about its axis, the period being 243 days. The mass of Venus is 4.87 x 10 24 kg. Determine the radius for a synchronous satellite in orbit about Venus. Solution: Given: M V = 4.87 x10 24 kg, T V = 243 days Recognize: Synchronous means that the period of
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Unformatted text preview: the satellite equals the period of Venus, T s =T V Convert T V to seconds and find r s Compare this to the radius of Venus: 6.05x10 6 m Kepler’s Laws of Orbital Motion 1st Law - planets follow elliptical orbits with the Sun at one focus of the ellipse 2nd Law - the radius vector from the Sun to the planet sweeps out equal areas in equal time 3rd Law - the orbital period of a planet is proportional to the radius to the 3/2 power (derived for circular orbit – just replace r by a)...
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This note was uploaded on 12/10/2011 for the course PHY 1111 taught by Professor Stencil during the Fall '11 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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notes12a - the satellite equals the period of Venus, T s =T...

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