Hw10 - Phys 100 Fall 2011 Concepts of Physics Homework 10 Due 16 November 2011 In order to receive full credit you must show all work calculations

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Phys 100 Fall 2011 Concepts of Physics: Homework 10 Due: 16 November 2011 In order to receive full credit, you must show all work, calculations and provide complete reasons and explanations for your solutions. 1 Hobson, Physics: Concepts and Connections, 5ed Ch. 12 Conceptual Exercise 18, page 292. 2 Hobson, Physics: Concepts and Connections, 5ed Ch 12, Problem 10, page 293. Explain your answer. 3 Particles passing through a single slit A beam of electrons is ±red toward a barrier which is impenetrable everywhere except through slit, which is so narrow that an electron can only just pass through. The initial direction of each electron’s motion is vertical (absolutely no horizontal component). The probability distribution (curve) for the electron’s arrival at various points along the screen is illustrated in Fig. 1. Slit Electrons Screen Probability of electron arrival. Δ x A B Figure 1: Single slit electron experiment. a) Suppose that an electron arrives at the screen. In this case what would be a reasonable answer to the question: “Did the electron passed through the slit or not?” b) Is it possible for an electron to hit the screen at point A? 1
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c) Is it possible for an electron to hit the screen at point B? d) Only those electrons that were aimed precisely at the slit will ever pass through and their states of motion prior to arrival at the slit will be identical. What does this probability distribution imply regarding the point at which any one of these electrons strikes the screen? Will it always strike the screen at the same point? e) In this scenario, all that the electrons all started with the same initial state of motion. Compare this to dropping a set of balls from the same point through a suFciently wide slit. Would they all land at the same spot? Would your intuition (or equivalently classical physics) predict that the electrons will arrive at the same point on the screen? How does this compare to your answer to part (d)?
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course PHYS 100 taught by Professor Collins during the Fall '11 term at Mesa CC.

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Hw10 - Phys 100 Fall 2011 Concepts of Physics Homework 10 Due 16 November 2011 In order to receive full credit you must show all work calculations

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