2-3 - 2-3 Logarithmic FunctionsThecommon log of a numberis...

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Unformatted text preview: 2-3 Logarithmic FunctionsThecommon log of a numberis that exponent(or power) to which 10 must be raised to obtain the number.Notation:y = log(x) or y = log x "y = log of x"Example: log (1000) = . . .. . . the power to which 10 must be raised to obtain 1000so log(1000) = 3Another way to put it: 3 = log(1000) because 103= 1000y = log(x) means10y= xBe CAREFUL! log x + 2log(x + 2) log x + 2 = log(x) + 2 Keep this in mind at all times:A LOGISANEXPONENT!!!!Practice:x1101000.1log x2-3p. 1Since logs are defined using exponentials, any log x has an equivalent exponent form, and vice-versa.Going from log formto exponent form(a visual scheme)LOG FORMEXPONENT FORMEx. log513 = x5x= 13Remember a log is an exponent___________________________________________Going from exponent formto log formEXPONENT FORMLOG FORMEx. y14= x==>log yx = 14Remember -- a log is an exponent2-3p. 2Inverse properties of logarithms Think about log 10x:log 10xis the power to which we must raise 10 to get 10...
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This note was uploaded on 12/11/2011 for the course MATH 1324 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Austin Community College.

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2-3 - 2-3 Logarithmic FunctionsThecommon log of a numberis...

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