Adams found his next fight in 1784 when young Bostonians founded the Sans Souci Club

Adams found his next fight in 1784 when young Bostonians founded the Sans Souci Club

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Unformatted text preview: Adams found his next fight in 1784 when young Bostonians founded the Sans Souci Club, and Boston's nightlife began to rival that of New York's. Rumors even swirled that the city might become home to a gambling club that allowed girls over the age of sixteen inside. Adams began writing editorials as vitriolic and sour as any he wrote during the period before the revolution. He hinted that the city would fall just as the mass orgies had once brought about the fall of Rome. The city could be corrupted so soon after it won its freedom and cleansed itself of the impurities of Britain. In 1792, Adams even attempted to have a traveling theater group jailed. Harvard students complained of his efforts as crusader of morals, and others charged he merely wanted to raise another mob. However, years of abuse had thickened Adams's skin, and he merely replied that mob....
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This note was uploaded on 12/12/2011 for the course HIST 1320 taught by Professor Murphy during the Fall '08 term at Texas State.

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